What is a Linking Verb? Definition, Rules And Examples

If you’re learning English, you’ve probably heard the term “linking verb” before. But what exactly is a linking verb? How does it differ from other types of verbs? And why is it important to understand? In this article, we’ll answer all of these questions and more. We’ll provide you with a clear definition of linking verbs, explain the rules for using them correctly, and give you plenty of examples to help you understand how they work in context.

What is a Linking Verb?

A linking verb is a type of verb that connects the subject of a sentence to a noun, pronoun, or adjective that renames or describes the subject. Linking verbs do not show action, but instead, they show a state of being or a relationship between two things. The most common linking verbs in English are “be,” “am,” “is,” “are,” “was,” “were,” “been,” and “being.”

What is a Linking Verb Definition, Rules And Examples

Rules for Using Linking Verbs:

  1. Use a linking verb when you want to connect the subject of a sentence to a noun, pronoun, or adjective that renames or describes the subject. Example: The cat is furry. (The linking verb “is” connects the subject “cat” to the adjective “furry.”)
  2. Use a linking verb when you want to express a state of being or a condition. Example: I am tired. (The linking verb “am” expresses a state of being, in this case, tiredness.)
  3. Use a linking verb when you want to express a relationship between two things. Example: She seems happy. (The linking verb “seems” expresses a relationship between the subject “she” and the adjective “happy.”)
  4. Do not use a linking verb when you want to show action. Use an action verb instead. Example: The cat chased the mouse. (The action verb “chased” shows the action of the subject “cat.”)

Examples of Linking Verbs:

  1. He is tall.
  2. The flowers smell lovely.
  3. The cake looks delicious.
  4. The students seem excited.
  5. The music sounds beautiful.
  6. The room feels stuffy.

In each of these examples, the linking verb connects the subject to a noun, pronoun, or adjective that describes or renames the subject.

FAQs:

  1. Q. What is the difference between a linking verb and an action verb? A. A linking verb connects the subject to a noun, pronoun, or adjective that describes or renames the subject. An action verb shows the action of the subject.
  2. Q. Can linking verbs show action? A. No, linking verbs do not show action. They express a state of being or a relationship between two things.
  3. Q. Are all forms of “be” linking verbs? A. Yes, all forms of “be” (be, am, is, are, was, were, been, being) are linking verbs.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, linking verbs are an important part of English grammar. By understanding what linking verbs are, how they work, and when to use them, you can improve your writing and speaking skills. Remember, linking verbs connect the subject of a sentence to a noun, pronoun, or adjective that renames or describes the subject. They do not show action, but instead, they show a state of being or a relationship between two things. So the next time you see a sentence with a linking verb, you’ll know exactly how to use it correctly and why it’s being used in that way. With practice, you’ll become more confident in identifying and using linking verbs in your own writing and speaking.

One important thing to remember when using linking verbs is to choose the right verb based on the subject and the context of the sentence. For example, you wouldn’t use the linking verb “smell” to describe a person’s height because it doesn’t make sense in that context.

Additionally, linking verbs can be used in various tenses, so it’s important to understand how they change based on the tense. For example, “am” is the present tense form of “be,” while “was” is the past tense form of “be.” Understanding the different forms of linking verbs can help you use them correctly in different types of sentences.

In summary, understanding linking verbs is essential for effective communication in English. By knowing what linking verbs are, how they work, and when to use them, you can improve your writing and speaking skills. Remember to choose the right linking verb based on the subject and context of the sentence, and practice using different forms of linking verbs in various tenses. With these skills, you’ll be able to write and speak with clarity and confidence.