List of Conjunctions: Everything You Need to Know

Conjunctions are an integral part of the English language. They are used to connect words, phrases, and clauses to make sentences more concise and easier to understand. In this article, we will provide you with a comprehensive guide to the most common conjunctions in English. We will discuss their types, functions, and usage in detail, providing you with plenty of examples to help you better understand how to use them correctly.

What are Conjunctions?

A conjunction is a word that connects words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence. They are used to create complex sentences and to show the relationship between two or more ideas. There are three types of conjunctions: coordinating, subordinating, and correlative conjunctions.

List of Conjunctions Everything You Need to Know

Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions connect two or more independent clauses or sentences. They are also used to connect words or phrases that are of equal importance. There are seven coordinating conjunctions in English: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. Here are some examples:

  • He wants to go to the park, but he is feeling sick.
  • I like coffee and tea, but I prefer tea.
  • She is neither tall nor short, but of average height.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions connect a dependent clause to an independent clause. They are used to show the relationship between the two clauses. There are many subordinating conjunctions in English, such as because, although, since, while, and until.

Here are some examples:

  • Because he was feeling sick, he decided not to go to the park.
  • Although it was raining, we still went for a walk.
  • Since I finished my work early, I went for a run.

Correlative Conjunctions

Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs to connect words or phrases of equal importance. There are five pairs of correlative conjunctions: either…or, neither…nor, not only…but also, both…and, and whether…or.

Here are some examples:

  • You can either stay here or come with me.
  • Neither the teacher nor the students knew the answer.
  • She not only sings but also plays the guitar.

Commonly Confused Conjunctions

Some conjunctions are commonly confused with each other because they are similar in spelling or meaning.

Here are some examples:

  • And vs. But: And is used to connect two ideas that are similar or of equal importance, whereas but is used to connect two ideas that contrast with each other.
  • Although vs. Even though: Although and even though are both subordinating conjunctions that mean the same thing, but even though is more informal.
  • As vs. Because: As and because are both subordinating conjunctions used to show the reason for something, but as can also be used to show the way something is done.

Common Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions introduce a subordinate clause, which is a dependent clause that cannot stand alone as a sentence. These conjunctions are used to show the relationship between the subordinate clause and the main clause. Here are some common subordinating conjunctions:

a. After – It shows that something happens after something else.

Example: After she finished her homework, she watched TV.

b. Although – It shows that two ideas are contradictory.

Example: Although it was raining, we still went outside.

c. As – It is used to show the reason or cause of something.

Example: As I was walking down the street, I saw a car crash.

d. Because – It is used to give a reason for something.

Example: I didn’t go to the party because I was sick.

e. If – It is used to show a condition.

Example: If it rains, we’ll stay inside.

f. Since – It is used to show that something happened in the past and is still happening.

Example: Since I moved to New York, I have been very busy.

g. Though – It is used to show two contrasting ideas.

Example: Though he is young, he is very intelligent.

h. Until – It is used to show a point in time.

Example: I’ll stay here until you get back.

i. Unless – It is used to show a condition that must be met.

Example: You won’t pass the test unless you study.

j. While – It is used to show two actions that are happening at the same time.

Example: While I was studying, my roommate was watching TV.

Common Correlative Conjunctions

Correlative conjunctions come in pairs and are used to connect two equal parts of a sentence. Here are some common correlative conjunctions:

a. Both…and – It is used to show that two things are true.

Example: Both the cat and the dog are friendly.

b. Either…or – It is used to show a choice between two things.

Example: You can either come with us or stay here.

c. Neither…nor – It is used to show that two things are not true.

Example: Neither the book nor the movie was good.

d. Not only…but also – It is used to show that two things are true.

Example: Not only was he a great singer, but he was also an amazing dancer.

e. Whether…or – It is used to show a choice between two things.

Example: Whether you come with us or stay here is up to you.

Common Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctive adverbs are used to connect independent clauses. They show the relationship between the two clauses. Here are some common conjunctive adverbs:

a. However – It is used to show a contrast between two things.

Example: I like dogs; however, I’m allergic to them.

b. Moreover – It is used to add information to what has already been said.

Example: The movie was great; moreover, the acting was superb.

c. Nevertheless – It is used to show that something still exists or is true despite what was previously said.

Example: The weather was bad; nevertheless, we still had a good time.

d. Therefore – It is used to show a result or conclusion.

Example: I studied hard; therefore, I passed the test.

e. Otherwise – It is used to show what will happen if something else doesn’t happen.

Example: We need to hurry; otherwise, we’ll be late.

FAQs:

  • Q: What is the purpose of conjunctions in English?
  • A: Conjunctions are used to connect words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence, to make sentences more concise and easier to understand.
  • Q: What are the three types of conjunctions?
  • A: The three types of conjunctions are coordinating, subordinating, and correlative conjunctions.
  • Q: What are some commonly confused conjunctions?
  • A: Some commonly confused conjunctions include and vs. but, although vs. even though, and as vs. because.